About Us

The Empirical Studies of Conflict Project (ESOC) identifies, compiles, and analyzes micro-level conflict data and information on insurgency, civil war, and other sources of politically motivated violence worldwide. ESOC empowers the nation’s best minds with the quality of data and information needed to address some of the most enduring and pressing challenges to international security. Ultimately, ESOC is committed to providing war fighters and policy makers with greater expert analyses and recommendations for responding to security threats.

  • Map of local government proliferation across Indonesia

    ESOC Working Paper: Local Government Proliferation, Diversity, and Conflict Read more

  • Export Crops and Civil Conflict: image of banana production areas

    ESOC Working Paper: Export Crops and Civil Conflict Read more

  • ESOC Working Paper: Controlling Civilians? photo

    ESOC Working Paper: Controlling Civilians? Examining Support for the Military in Colombia Read more

  • ESOC Working Paper: Reading Between the Lines-word cloud

    ESOC Working Paper: Reading Between the Lines Read more

  • Map for Employment and Support for Wartime Violence

    ESOC Working Paper: Employment and Support for Wartime Violence Read more

  • Afghanistan Read more

  • Iraq Read more

  • Pakistan Read more

  • Philippines Read more

  • Vietnam Read more

Research Highlights

That leaves patience, containment, and humanitarian aid as the least-bad policies while waiting for this awful war to play itself out.

Foundations of the Islamic State: Management, Money, and Terror in Iraq, 2005–2010 draws from more than 140 recently declassified documents to present a comprehensive examination of the organization, territorial designs, management, personnel policies, and finances of the Islamic State of Iraq

Working Papers

The creation of new local governments is a pervasive feature of decentralization in developing countries. This redistricting process often causes substantial changes in two widely debated sources of conflict: diversity and contestable public resources.